SOLIDARITY
ECONOMY
SYSTEM 

PROJECT: urban design proposal, design and urban ecologies studio I - parsons school of design

ADVISOR: gabriela perez rendon

TEAM: michaela kramer & isabel saffon

PARTNERS: UHAB & ridgewood bushwick senior

citizens council (RBSSC)

YEAR: 2016

LOCATION: new york, ny

THEMES: urban design, affordable housing, co-operative housing, gentrification, displacement, urban strategies

The proposal, developed in collaboration with Michaela Kramer and Isabel Saffon as part of the Fall 2015 Design and Urban Ecologies studio at Parsons, aims to address the current affordable housing crisis and recent threats to the neighborhood due to gentrification. The long-term affordability and development of the neighborhood in a holistic and sustainable way is promoted through a system of integrated solidarity economies.

 

A limited equity housing co-op, comprised by shareholders, will own and manage buildings leased by a community land trust. In this proposal, the community becomes connected by shared capacities for living, working, and playing. Affordable housing is complemented by other uses and services, such as a food co-op, a daycare, and co-working spaces. The Solidarity Economy System enhances the currant urban setting, both the social and built environment. 

PROJECT

ADVISOR

TEAM

PARTNERS

YEAR

LOCATION

THEMES

urban design proposal

design and urban ecologies studio I

parsons school of design

gabriela perez rendon

michaela kramer & isabel saffon

UHAB & ridgewood bushwick senior

citizens council (RBSSC)

2016

new york, ny

urban design, affordable housing,

co-operative housing, gentrification, displacement, urban strategies

The project strategically uses existing co-ops and other underutilized structures identified through a spatial analysis of the housing conditions and housing stock in Bushwick. First, 17 buildings that are currently being formed into a community co-op form the basis or core of the project. Second, the project aims to incorporate existing co-ops that are currently at risk. Third, we identified vacant and distressed buildings that are underutilized and available for housing. Finally, we see an opportunity in the many 1-floor garages, that due to 70% of Bushwick households not owning a car, are often vacant or being used as storage. 

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